e-book We Are All Equal: Student Culture and Identity at a Mexican Secondary School, 1988–1998

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Students will also be responsible for writing four papers each one of pages in length. Three of these papers will be based on questions that draw comparisons among various works we have read in class. Required Readings :. Please see the reading listed under each date, below, for specific reading assignments. All readings are available via electronic reserves and hard copies are also on reserve at Walter Stiern Library. To access e-reserves, go to www.

If your computer is not already equipped with Adobe Reader, you can download it from www. Grading and Assignments:. Lead discussion: Preparation sheet for leading discussion: Response paper to the Mead video due February 2 : Response paper to the Malinowski video due February 9 : First Paper due January 28 : Second Paper due February 23 : Third Paper due March 3 : Fourth Paper due March 17 : Total points: Grading scheme :. Classroom policies :. I will not accept late papers unless you have a documented excuse. See the guidelines below for policies related to response papers.

All papers are due at the beginning of class on the date listed, and you must attend class that day to have your paper received. There is no extra credit offered. Please focus your efforts on the regularly assigned work. Do not come into class late or leave early, unless you have a compelling reason that you have discussed with me prior to class. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to find out what you missed.

Any more than three unexcused absences will negatively affect your grade. Please turn off your cell phones or pagers. Students who do not do so will receive an F in the course and will face disciplinary sanction by Student Discipline and Judicial Affairs. Qualified students with disabilities who need appropriate academic adjustments should contact me soon as possible to ensure that your needs are met in a timely manner.

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Upon such verification, all handouts and assignments will be available in alternative accessible formats upon request. When I grade your papers, I do not want to know who you are, so as to avoid any unfair bias in grading. To this end, I request that you turn in all papers with your name typed on the right corner of the first page only, and with that corner folded over, toward the back of the page. Guidelines for response papers:. These papers are not to exceed two pages.

In a double-spaced, typed paper, address all of the following points:. What were the main points of the movie or presentation? How were these exemplified? What did it reaffirm or teach you about anthropological concepts? Tie the video or concepts from it concretely to others that we have discussed or read about in class. Cite your sources.

We Are All Equal: Student Culture and Identity at a Mexican Secondary School, 1988 1998

Address the effectiveness of the presentation. What did it do well? How could it have been stronger? Be specific. Assignments are due on the day under which they are listed.

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For example, for class on Wednesday, January 7, please read the articles on reserve by Kuhn and by Spencer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. New York: McGraw-Hill. Read pp. New York: Harper Perennial. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. Behar and Deborah Gordon, eds. Berkeley: University of. New York: Perennial Classics. Gibson, M.

School connections: U. Mexican youth, peers and school achievement. Gore, J. Disciplining bodies: On the continuity of power relations in pedagogy. In Popkewitz, T. Heath, S. On ethnography: Approaches to language and literacy research. Ingersoll, R. Jones, D. The genealogy of the modern schoolteacher. In Ball, S. Kant, I. Practical philosophy Ed. Kieffer, M.

Student Culture and Identity at a Mexican Secondary School, 1988–1998

Converging trajectories: Reading growth in language minority learners and their classmates, kindergarten to grade 8. American Educational Research Journal, 48 5 , — Ladson-Billings, G. From the education achievement gap to the education debt: Understanding achievement in U.

Educational Researcher, 35 7 , 3 — Lee, J. College for all: Gaps between desirable and actual P—12 math achievement. Trajectories for College Readiness Educational Researcher, 41 2 , 43 — Levinson, B. We are all equal: Student culture and identity at a Mexican secondary school, — The cultural production of the educated person: An introduction.

In Levinson, B. Link, H. Doing well in school: Repertoires of success at the end of elementary school. Unpublished doctoral thesis. In Portes, P.

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Latinization: Education and the New Latino South pp. McCarty, T. A place to be Navajo: Rough rock and the struggle for self-determination in indigenous schooling. New York, NY : Routledge. McDermott, R. The cultural work of learning disabilities. Educational Researcher, 35 6 , 12 — Culture as disability.

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Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 26 3 , — Moll, L. Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms.

Theory Into Practice, 31, — Murrell, P. Race, culture and schooling: Identities of achievement in multicultural urban schools. Packer, M. The science of qualitative research. Peters, M. Why Foucault? Pollock, M.